Application of Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustical Holography (SONAH) in Cylindrical Coordinates to Noise Control of a Bladeless Fan

2019-12-05T14:42:41Z (GMT) by Weimin Thor
Near-field Acoustical Holography is a tool that is conventionally used to visualize sound fields through an inverse process in a three-dimensional space so that either sound field projections or sound source localization can be performed. The visualization is conducted by using sound pressure measurements taken in the near-field region close to the surface of the unknown sound source. Traditional Fourier-based Near-field Acoustical Holography requires a large number of measurement inputs to avoid spatial truncation effects. However, the use of a large number of measurements is usually not feasible since having a large number of microphones is costly, and usually the array is limited in size by the physical environment, thus limiting the practicality of this method. In the present work, because of the desire to reduce the number of microphones required to conduct acoustical holography, a method known as Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustical Holography initially proposed by Steiner and Hald was analyzed. The main difference between the present work and the concept mentioned by Steiner and Hald is the cylindrical coordinate system employed here for the purpose of experimenting on a bladeless fan, which resembles a cylindrical structure and which could be assumed to be a cylindrical source. The algorithm was first verified via simulations and measurements, and was then applied to experimental data obtained via pressure measurements made with a cylindrical microphone array. Finally, suggestions for noise control strategies for the bladeless fan are described, based on the measurement results.