Load Response of Topologically Interlocked Material Systems - Archimedean and Laves Tilings

2019-08-16T16:39:58Z (GMT) by Andrew Williams
Segmented material systems have been shown to provide advantages over monolithic materials including the potential for combinations of properties such as strength, toughness, and ductility that are not otherwise attainable. One such class of segmented system is that of topologically interlocked material (TIM) systems. These are material systems consisting of one or more repeating unit blocks assembled in a planar configuration. When coupled with a bounding frame, this plate-like structure can withstand transverse loads without the use of adhesive or fasteners between blocks.

One method of generating TIM systems is to start with a 2D tiling and project each edge of the tiles at alternating angles from the tile normal. This work examines 18 unique configurations of TIM systems generated from the Archimedean and the Laves tilings. These systems are constructed as segmented plates having approximately the same number of building blocks and with equivalent overall dimensions so that the effect of the segmentation patterns on the load response of the TIM system can be investigated. Finite element models were utilized to simulate both displacement controlled loading and body force loading of each configuration with various coefficients of friction. The load responses were recorded and the characteristics of chirality and reciprocity of the load response were observed.

The TIM system configurations in this study resulted in a wide variety of performance. Their range of properties is presented, and a mechanism for strength in a TIM system is postulated. The findings of this work enable the material design space to be expanded by facilitating the creation of material systems with a greater range of properties than is possible with monolithic materials.