SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF RELATIONSHIP SATISFACTION, SELF-ESTEEM, AND SOCIAL COMPARISON ORIENTATION

2020-05-06T15:12:26Z (GMT) by Kaitlyn B Gantz
The current research study examined the way that social networking site use impacts individuals’ self-esteem in relation to their romantic relationship, relationship satisfaction, and social comparison orientation. Previous research has established links between SNS use and negative mental health outcomes, but no current research studies SNS use, specifically time spent on SNS use, and how it relates to self-esteem, relationship satisfaction, and social comparison orientation. Using social comparison theory, this study predicted that increased time spent on SNSs would negatively impact relationship satisfaction, self-esteem, and positively predict social comparison orientation. An online survey was used to test the relationship among these variables by asking questions and using scales related to relationship satisfaction, relationship contingent self-esteem, and social comparison orientation, while looking at how time spent on SNS impacted these results, as well as how often an individual posts about their relationship impacted the results. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. This study found that increased time spent on SNS platforms did negatively impact relationship satisfaction and self-esteem, as well as positively predict social comparison orientation. Although, some of the hypotheses were not supported or were only partially supported, the findings from this study further show the importance of understanding SNS use, especially in the clinical context, so it can be assessed and utilized in the therapy setting.