TEACHER PERCEPTION ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORTS FOR STUDENTS WITH EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL DISABILITIES

2020-05-01T22:07:39Z (GMT) by Michael Foster Henry

Student behavior, such as in students with EBD (Emotional and Behavioral Disability), can cause disruptions and be difficult to direct in a positive manner (Stoutjesdijk, Scholte, & Swaab, 2012). Perceptions of these students happen before the student ever enters the classroom. Many general education teachers develop a negative perception of any student labeled EBD and that perception impacts the way the teacher interacts and perceives the actions of the student with EBD. It was found that teachers were over 80% more likely to give negative responses to the students with emotional and behavioral disability than to general education students (Sazak-Pinar, Elif & Güner-Yildiz, 2013). Often when teachers perceive students with EBD in this fashion, the student begins to develop a view of negative self-worth and begin to question if they have any value (Gallagher, 1997).

This study was done to gather information and build a pathway to develop a training handbook that can be a resource for existing and future teachers. This training handbook focuses on techniques, but not simply the techniques by themselves. These techniques stress the needs to work with other skills. No technique works all alone nor for every student. Flexibility is paramount and this handbook will assist the reader in understanding how to incorporate techniques to best assist students with EBD.