Using Suction for Laminar Flow Control in Hypersonic Quiet Wind Tunnels: A Feasibility Study

2019-10-16T19:58:50Z (GMT) by Phillip Portoni
To reduce the risk of using suction in a hypersonic quiet-tunnel nozzle design, this project tested micro-perforated suction sections to remove the boundary layer on an axisymmetric model in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. The model was a cone-flare geometry tested at 0° angle of attack. The turn from the 7° half-angle cone to the flare was designed to prevent flow separation. The flare was designed to amplify the Görtler instability.

Five suction sections were designed with different perforation patterns and porosities. Four were successfully manufactured, but only the first of the four sections has been tested so far. The first suction section has pores drilled along straight lines with a nominal 5% porosity.

Measurements were made with temperature-sensitive paint and oil-flow visualization on a non-perforated blank to measure the baseline development of Görtler vortices on the flare. Although the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement techniques were insufficient to measure the vortices, it was confirmed that the boundary layer is laminar for the entire model. Measurements with suction also did not show the Görtler vortices.

Surface pressure fluctuations were measured on the flare. Apparent second-mode waves were detected. The suction measurements showed a slight increase in second-mode peak frequency over the baseline results, as expected.

Concerns had been raised about acoustic noise that might be radiated from the suction section. Thus, fluctuations above the suction section were measured using a pitot probe and using focused-laser differential interferometry. The measurements during suction showed no noticeable increase in fluctuations compared to the baseline results.