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COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS FOR MODELING AND SIMULATION OF INTRAOCULAR DRUG DELIVERY AND WALL SHEAR STRESS IN PULSATILE FLOW

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thesis
posted on 04.08.2020 by seyedalireza abootorabi
The thesis includes two application studies of computational fluid dynamics. The first is new and efficient drug delivery to the posterior part of the eye, a growing health necessity worldwide. Current treatment of eye diseases, such as age related macular degeneration (AMD), relies on repeated intravitreal injections of drug-containing solutions. Such a drug delivery has significant drawbacks, including short drug life, vital medical service, and high medical costs. In this study, we explore a new approach of controlled drug delivery by introducing unique porous implants. Computational
modeling contains physiological and anatomical traits. We simulate the IgG1 Fab drug delivery to the posterior eye to evaluate the effectiveness of the porous implants to control the drug delivery. The computational model was validated by established computation results from independent studies and experimental data. Overall, the results indicate that therapeutic drug levels in the posterior eye are sustained for
eight weeks, similar to those performed with intravitreal injection of the same drug. We evaluate the effects of the porous implant on the time evaluation of the drug concentrations in the sclera, choroid, and retina layers of the eye. Subsequent simulations were carried out with varying porosity values of a porous episcleral implant.
Our computational results reveal that the time evolution of drug concentration is distinctively correlated to drug source location and pore size. The response of this porous implant for controlled drug delivery applications was examined. A correlation between porosity and fluid properties for the porous implants was revealed in this study. The second application lays in the computational modeling of the oscillating flow in rectangular ducts. This computational study has further applications in investigating the fluid flow motion in bodily organs. It can be useful in studying the
response of bone cells to the wall shear stress in the human body.

Funding

National Science Foundation under grant No. 1803845

IU-STEM via faculty collaborative award

History

Degree Type

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Department

Mechanical Engineering

Campus location

Indianapolis

Advisor/Supervisor/Committee Chair

Huidan Yu

Additional Committee Member 2

Hiroki Yokota

Additional Committee Member 3

Khosrow Nematollahi

Licence

Exports